Sociology

a program reflecting UCSF's commitment to cutting-edge research on health

The Sociology PhD program at UCSF offers an exceptionally deep curriculum focused on the sociology of health, illness, biomedicine, and health care systems. The program is one of the most highly ranked graduate programs in sociology nationwide: the National Research Council in 2010 ranked the UCSF program 6th-20th out of a field of 118 sociology doctoral programs. The program features extensive training in both general sociological theory and the sociology of health, illness, and medicine; it also provides rigorous methodological training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, including hands-on learning through the conduct of original research. Commitments to social justice and reducing health inequalities pervade the curriculum and the research of faculty and students.

faculty
Faculty for the Sociology program include five core Sociology faculty as well as 36 Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBS) faculty members, including emerita and adjunct professors.

The Sociology Program is part of a network of social science communities at UCSF, including the Institute for Health & Aging, the Center for Transdisciplinary ELSI Research in Translational Genomics, the Center for Health and Community, and the Social and Population Sciences Research Consortium. The program also has key relationships with such Bay Area intellectual communities as the Science & Justice Center (at UC Santa Cruz), and the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society (at UC Berkeley).

specializations
global health and global health policy
race, class, gender and health disparities
science, technology, and medicine studies

Faculty affiliated with the program have additional expertise in aging, HIV/AIDS, and violence as a health issue.

The Sociology program office is located at the Laurel Heights campus. Visit the program website for more information.


The Sociology program is offered by the UCSF Graduate Division
administered by the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBS)
in the UCSF School of Nursing
delivered by faculty members in SBS and the School of Nursing